Monday, March 17, 2014

5 Ways The War On Drugs Makes Us Less Safe

America Has a Black-Market Problem, Not a Drug Problem
 
The head of the military's Southern Command wants more money to fight a losing battle.

 

General John F. Kelly, the head of the U.S. Southern Command, testified last week before the Senate Armed Services Committee, where he argued, as generals tend to do, that he has inadequate resources to fulfill the missions assigned to him. 
Here's how the Associated Press summed up his statement:

The U.S. doesn’t have the ships and surveillance capabilities to go after the illegal drugs flowing into the U.S. from Latin America, the top military commander for the region told senators Thursday, adding that the lack of resources means he has to “sit and watch it go by.”
Gen. John Kelly told the Senate Armed Services Committee that he is able to get about 20 percent of the drugs leaving Colombia for the U.S., but the rest gets through. 
Think about that.

Though the U.S. spends billions of dollars each year fighting the War on Drugs, and despite having done so for many years, 80 percent of the drugs from one of the countries we've focused on the most still gets through all of our interdiction efforts. 

Is the answer to throw more money at the prohibitionist strategy?

Kelly requests more resources:

For the rest of the story: http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2014/03/america-has-a-black-market-problem-not-a-drug-problem/284447/

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